Iowa Lincoln Highway Artist In Residence

Greetings fellow travelers.  You have all seen my Hot Rod Art style, but I wanted to give you a taste of something a little different.  As the Artist-in-Residence for the Iowa Lincoln Highway Association, I have the pleasure of creating drawings of historical sites along the landscape of the Iowa Lincoln Highway.  Most all of these drawings are taken from the early days of the Lincoln Highway.

Now think back with me to what folks experienced driving back around 1913.  These folks drove the Model-T Ford, a novelty to the common man, as was the new idea of a road trip.  The road trip caught on as a new pass-time across the nation as more people left their homes to experience new sights.  Unfortunately, the road system was not ready for this new trend and was better for the horse and buggy, not the automobile.  Long distance automobile travel was something new, as before, most had been done on the railroad lines.

Youngville Station

Youngville Station was a one-stop. A one-stop was a combination diner, hotel, and gas station all in one. The original site of the Youngville Station sits several miles west of Cedar Rapids, Iowa.  Youngville offered tourist cabins for rest at $1 per night and a cafe for eating, if you could afford a home cooked meal. If not, the cabins also provided a campsite for your dining needs. It also offered a mechanic on duty and two, state-of-the-art, visible gas pumps.

Places like Youngville usually grew up around the crossroads, spread just far enough apart so that they would bring commerce to each station and not compete with one another.

Today this site is a restored interpretive site for the Lincoln Highway in Iowa.  If you happen by Cedar Rapids, continue on and take in the wonderful history of the Youngville Station and maybe taste a little of the life folks lived many years ago.

Vote for the B.E.E.R party today!

vildaWith it being the season of blowhards and wannabes contending to change America, here is the real candidate for the job!  Les Vilda, a historical educator from Wilber, Nebraska, is the candidate for the B.E.E.R, Biologically Engineered Experimental Reindeer…or whatever, party. If he is elected, he will rid this country of its worst enemy, skunked beer.

If any of you have the opportunity, check him out on YouTube or at his website, Have Donkey, Will Travel

You go, Les!  (a.k.a. Dr. Rabbi).

From the Road,

Lincoln Highway Johnny

Historic BoomTown, IA

Hello from your Vagabond Road Artist, Lincoln Highway Johnny.  Here is a link to some photos of my BoomTown, Iowa Coal Town, taken by Jeff Terranova on one of his visits.  The work you see done on the automobiles and buildings has been a process over many years, completed mostly by myself, with some help from my vagabond son.

IMG_2546

I hope you enjoy my work and Jeff’s.

From the Road,

Lincoln Highway Johnny

Hot Rod Art

Greetings from your Vagabond Road Artist, Lincoln Highway Johnny.  I figured it was about time to join the technological world and get my art out of the house and onto the road.

As I said in my “About,” my style was inspired by the original Big Daddy Ed Roth, which is what you will see on here. Here is one of my first drawings in his style.

The Step-Down Hudson, from 1948-1954, had a unique design which made it easier in turns, as it had center-line steering, which was a state-of-the-art design for that time.  It’s powerhouse was a 308, Twin-H Power, Flathead 6 engine. On the dirt tracks of America, the only other car that even had a chance to keep up was the Oldsmobile 88.  The Hudson brand won many a race on the early dirt tracks, and this drawing is dedicated to that wonderful machine.

hudsons racer

I hope you enjoy and come on back for more.

From the Road,

Lincoln Highway Johnny